Tag: hidden history

Quiz: Can You Answer These Rarely Known Questions About the US Constitution?


Test your knowledge! A recent survey by Newsweek suggests that 70% of Americans do not know the basics of our US Constitution and 57% of Americans have never read the Constitution.

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Robbed and Murdered: The Slanderous Tombstone That Accused an Innocent Man


Many pages of history have been recorded from old epitaphs of tombstones which frequently reveal not only a person’s death but how and whether the end was peaceful. 

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People of the Dark Water: The Lumbee Controversy for Sovereignty

“They say we’re not real Indians!” For over 100 years, the Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina has been fighting for federal recognition amidst the controversy surrounding their heritage.

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Civil Rights in Carolina: A Native American’s Story

When one thinks of the Civil Rights era, it’s usually a black and white issue. North Carolina, however, was one of the few states labeled tri-racial. There were three school systems, three seating areas, and three water fountains. Descended from the Tuscarora tribe and member of the North Carolina Coharie Tribe, Hughie Maynor’s family and ancestorial roots historically date back to before 1712. But during the years leading up to the Civil Rights Movement, he faced hardship and adversity, from extreme poverty to tri-segregated schools. When he was 13 years old, he helped organize and participate in North Carolina’s first Native American Sit-In protest in 1960 that took his fight all the way to the federal courts.

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Kentucky’s Great Flood of 1912 and the Heroism of Baseball Legend Rube Waddell

Located on the Mississippi River, the town of Hickman, Kentucky was devastated by two floods.

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Arthur “Peg Leg Sam” Jackson: Harmonica Blues Virtuoso and The Last Medicine Show

Arthur “Peg Leg Sam” Jackson was the most amazing harmonica virtuoso to ever hit the blues and folk festival music scene. Arthur “Peg Leg Sam” Jackson is now known among many blues musicians across the South as that “peg leg harp player that plays two harps at once (one with his nose).”

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Frankie Silver: Unjustly Hanged or Guilty of Murder

It’s the most famous, dramatic trial in North Carolina history, a murder mystery that shocked a small community in Mitchell County.  In 1831 a beautiful young girl named Francis “Frankie” Silver had just turned 18. She had a toddler named Nancy and a husband who was well-known in their small town for his love of drinking and consorting with other women.

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A Dog’s Life: How a Beloved Stray Changed a Small Appalachian Town

Rockford, Alabama is a small quiet rural Appalachian town with a population of about 450.  This quaint Coosa County town has one red light and one police officer because according to the locals, that’s all they need.

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Phoebe Ward: The Mysterious Hag Witch of Northampton County

The legend of Phoebe Ward, the hag witch of Northampton County, North Carolina, became widely known when her story was brought to the big stage in Elizabeth A. Lay’s folk superstition drama When Witches Ride. This native folk play was one of the first productions presented by the Carolina Playmakers in 1922.

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Sitting Up with the Dead: Lost Appalachian Burial Customs


From the peaks of the Blue Ridge and the Great Smoky Mountains to the river valleys of the French Broad and Catawba, North Carolina has a long history that is steeped in rich Appalachian traditions.  Despite the Hollywood “hillbilly” stereotype, Appalachians carry a sense of pride for their culture, language, and heritage.

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