Richard Petty and North Carolina’s Last NASCAR Dirt Track Race


The State Fairgrounds Speedway, located in Raleigh, North Carolina was a half-mile oval dirt racetrack that sponsored auto races for NASCAR’s top series in 1955, 1969 and 1970.  Now known as “The King” of NASCAR Hall of Famer, Richard Petty won the last Grand National race on the dirt track.  Although the track is no longer used as a motor speedway, the grandstand, now called the Sam G. Rand Grandstand, still remains and is used today for events held at the North Carolina State Fair.

Continue reading “Richard Petty and North Carolina’s Last NASCAR Dirt Track Race”

Johnny Carson and the Great Toilet Paper Shortage of 1973

Through a comedy of errors, this mostly forgotten piece of history concerns Johnny Carson, toilet paper and millions of fearful Americans.

Continue reading “Johnny Carson and the Great Toilet Paper Shortage of 1973”

Folklife: The Forgotten Custom of Women Proposing to Men During Leap Year

The custom of women proposing to men during Leap Year is traced back to a legend of St. Patrick. So girls get out your scarlet flannel petticoats and make a date with your local justice of the peace!  No worries fellas! You can blame the Scots for declaring it open season on bachelors.

Continue reading “Folklife: The Forgotten Custom of Women Proposing to Men During Leap Year”

Appalachian Legend: The Wild West Stagecoach Bandit Who Couldn’t Ride a Horse

An Appalachian legend in his own right and Kentucky native George Brittain Lyttle aka Dick Fellows aka Richard Perkins, turned out to be the most famous stagecoach bandit of the wild west that couldn’t ride a horse!   

Continue reading “Appalachian Legend: The Wild West Stagecoach Bandit Who Couldn’t Ride a Horse”

Photo Stories: Jean Addie Bissett Bostock playing tennis on ice skates!



Jean was an international tennis player and ranked in the world top ten in 1947 and 1948. (1940 – Photo Courtesy of National Archives Britain)

Continue reading “Photo Stories: Jean Addie Bissett Bostock playing tennis on ice skates!”

Robbed and Murdered: The Slanderous Tombstone That Accused an Innocent Man


Many pages of history have been recorded from old epitaphs of tombstones which frequently reveal not only a person’s death but how and whether the end was peaceful. 

Continue reading “Robbed and Murdered: The Slanderous Tombstone That Accused an Innocent Man”

Bloody Christmas of 1929: The Lawson Family Massacre


The story of the Lawson massacre shakes me every time. I heard about this story a couple of months back and I became obsessed with it. Even though this was almost a century ago, it’s still an insane story.

Continue reading “Bloody Christmas of 1929: The Lawson Family Massacre”

Vintage Christmas: Remembering the Sears Christmas Wish Book

The arrival of the Sears Christmas Wish Book began the start of the holiday season in our household.  As a child, I remember spending hours looking through the pages of the catalog plotting my Christmas wish list.  Having to share it with my four other siblings was another story. 

Continue reading “Vintage Christmas: Remembering the Sears Christmas Wish Book”

History’s Forgotten Car Maker: Richard Corbitt’s Motor Buggys and Trucks

Richard Corbitt (February 15, 1873 – May 16, 1961) was a successful North Carolina to­bacco merchant during the 1890s. Forced out of business by a large trust, Corbitt set up the Corbitt Buggy Company in 1899 in Henderson, North Carolina.

Continue reading “History’s Forgotten Car Maker: Richard Corbitt’s Motor Buggys and Trucks”