Category: Hidden History

Folklife: The Forgotten Custom of Women Proposing to Men During Leap Year

The custom of women proposing to men during Leap Year is traced back to a legend of St. Patrick. So girls get out your scarlet flannel petticoats and make a date with your local justice of the peace!  No worries fellas! You can blame the Scots for declaring it open season on bachelors.

Continue reading “Folklife: The Forgotten Custom of Women Proposing to Men During Leap Year”
Advertisements

Appalachian Legend: The Wild West Stagecoach Bandit Who Couldn’t Ride a Horse

An Appalachian legend in his own right and Kentucky native George Brittain Lyttle aka Dick Fellows aka Richard Perkins, turned out to be the most famous stagecoach bandit of the wild west that couldn’t ride a horse!   

Continue reading “Appalachian Legend: The Wild West Stagecoach Bandit Who Couldn’t Ride a Horse”

The Slanderous Tombstone That Changed A North Carolina Law

Many pages of history have been recorded from old epitaphs of tombstones which frequently reveal not only a person’s death but how and whether the end was peaceful.  Some inscriptions often comment on the deceased’s virtues, or lack thereof, of local natives in the community.  When foul play is involved, the victim’s tombstone may name the murderer and calls on the passerby to associate that name with the viciousness that resulted in a person’s death.

Continue reading “The Slanderous Tombstone That Changed A North Carolina Law”

Bloody Christmas of 1929: The Lawson Family Massacre

The story of the Lawson massacre shakes me every time. I heard about this story a couple of months back and I became obsessed with it. Even though this was almost a century ago, it’s still an insane story.

Continue reading “Bloody Christmas of 1929: The Lawson Family Massacre”

Vintage Christmas: Remembering the Sears Christmas Wish Book

The arrival of the Sears Christmas Wish Book began the start of the holiday season in our household.  As a child, I remember spending hours looking through the pages of the catalog plotting my Christmas wish list.  Having to share it with my four other siblings was another story. 

Continue reading “Vintage Christmas: Remembering the Sears Christmas Wish Book”

History’s Forgotten Car Maker: Richard Corbitt’s Motor Buggys and Trucks

Richard Corbitt (February 15, 1873 – May 16, 1961) was a successful North Carolina to­bacco merchant during the 1890s. Forced out of business by a large trust, Corbitt set up the Corbitt Buggy Company in 1899 in Henderson, North Carolina.

Continue reading “History’s Forgotten Car Maker: Richard Corbitt’s Motor Buggys and Trucks”

“Chief Buffalo Child” Long Lance: Tragedy of a Native American Hollywood Legend

“Chief Buffalo Child” Long Lance had a life that some people dream of having. He was a graduate of Carlisle Indian School and West Point Academy, best selling author, Hollywood actor, and life long friend of Jim Thorpe. But his past eventually caught up with him and he became a legend among one of the greatest imposters.

Continue reading ““Chief Buffalo Child” Long Lance: Tragedy of a Native American Hollywood Legend”

People of the Dark Water: The Lumbee Controversy for Sovereignty

“They say we’re not real Indians!” For over 100 years, the Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina has been fighting for federal recognition amidst the controversy surrounding their heritage.

Continue reading “People of the Dark Water: The Lumbee Controversy for Sovereignty”

Soldier Thrown in Air 1917: Lewis Hines History in Photos

Photographer Lewis Hine photographed American Red Cross relief work in Europe in 1917. While in Europe, he photographed the conditions in post-war and the relief efforts of the American Red Cross.

Continue reading “Soldier Thrown in Air 1917: Lewis Hines History in Photos”